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Global Security and Intelligence Studies

Global Security and Intelligence Studies

Abstract

Academic intelligence programs in the United States have grown markedly in the past 15 years. Their value to the U.S. intelligence community (IC) has received some attention in the literature, as has the role of training and tradecraft in those programs. The inclusion of such content has been identified and characterized as a new function of U.S. higher education in support of intelligence. Varied but limited views have been offered on the appropriateness of this sort of instruction in academic programs, a part of the value-added these programs may offer. To address this gap, we interviewed 10 intelligence educators and program directors so that a more inclusive picture of views and practices could be sketched. With their input, which certainly demonstrated variation, and consideration of current IC practice, we explore what facets of training and tradecraft can be appropriate for academic programs and offer recommendations accordingly. The article concludes that the delineation between intelligence education and training may not be so stark, largely because of the educational and social science underpinnings of analytic tradecraft and competencies, as well as various issues in IC training and tradecraft. By better connecting professional practice with social science foundations, academic intelligence programs can help create a better transition from education to training.

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